Cinderella

Cinderella, Thumbling, and The Tree of Golden Apples

Today I have a few new embroidery patterns to show off, brought to you by our wee Little Dorrit & Co design team! Whoop! (Click through to Flickr or visit the shop for more / larger photos.)

Cinderella

First up is our vision of the famous Cinderella – a little different than the image that immediately comes to mind, but we think she’s just as pretty. The original tale is, let’s just be honest, a bit bloodier than the version we’re used to. It’s a little weird. But that’s why we love these Grimm tales and found that they make such wonderful embroidered illustrations – they’re all a little on the weird side, some downright bizarre, but some are just so over-the-top that they’re very funny as well. Anyway, in the original story, Cinderella is just as loved by her Prince as in any version, and who can blame him? She’s quite fetching!

Cinderella

We put her in a dramatic, ornate Elizabethan gown because … well, why not?! We couldn’t resist the chance to put all that gold in her dress, all 1600s-stylee. Other than the gold (again, Anchor Lame, can’t go wrong with it!) in her skirt’s border section and her crown, we stuck with your basic embroidery stitches on this one. The floral fill of her skirt adds enough detail without crowding it with too much stitchy clutter. Best to keep it a little simpler and let the design do the work on this one.

Thumbling

We stitched our little Thumbling similarly, keeping it mostly simple. Thumbling is a very little guy who goes on a big adventure. He’s so tiny that he makes a sword out of a sewing needle and hides in a thimble. He is a tailor’s son, after all. This time I used the silver Anchor Lame (I swear we don’t get advertising bucks from Anchor or nothin’, I really just love it that much) to outline the thimble, and some simple lighter grays (in regular DMC stranded cotton) to stitch the markings on the thimble.

Thumbling

One cute stitchery thing in Thumbling, which was all Chrissy’s, is the way she tied his shoes with real tiny one-strand bows. So cute! We didn’t in this case, but sometimes you have to tack down the little loops so they don’t just twist and bunch up.

Tree Of Golden Apples

Now this one might really be my favorite, and I’ve thought about hanging it in my bedroom eventually. This is The Tree of Golden Apples, which is an image that re-appears throughout the Brothers Grimm tales. Again, we kept ours simple in just a few different threads and only couching and stem stitch.

Tree Of Golden Apples

The trunk / bark was a little experiment though, we tried the Anchor Marlitt floss for the first time — and loved it! (Correction made there: I thought it was DMC Satin, but just found my own notes. Whoops. I think we looked at both but the Marlitt had the right color and was shinier, though I could remember that wrong.) I find that you really need to couch it with more stitches than you do with the Lame thread, especially if you plan to wash your piece when you’ve finished. It kind of relaxes and becomes a bit bumpy. You can see it a little here, which is fine, but it did cause us a little aggravation elsewhere (more on that another day!). Other than that little note though, I found it to be a lovely floss – though I can’t vouch for actually stitching with it, I only used it as the main thread for couching.

There’s, again, more to come soon, and all these patterns are available at the Little Dorrit & Co. etsy shop now. And I should mention that we did so many in this set so we could work on our style together in one clump, and so we’d have something substantial to start our wee business with. We won’t always be working on sets of 9 patterns at a time! So, I will be back soon to show you some more as I get the rest photographed — and I think there will be a freebie coming along soon as well!